Apr 242017
 

Zibbz editorial for Blick magazine - Pink Flamingo

Tear sheet - Zibbz

I got to spend some time last month with Swiss brother and sister rock duo Zibbz at their Los Angeles bungalow for a profile just published in Blick Magazine. The magazine wanted to show their home lifestyle, in what it referred to as their “hippie flat,” for an article that would coincide with the release of their new single, “Run,” which just came out on March 10th. They were great to work with, allowing me to shoot wherever I wanted, even climbing up on the roof with me despite the fact that it was in the middle of an unusually hot day. Unfortunately those photos didn’t work out, but I appreciated their effort! If you read German you can learn more about them here. If not, you can at least check out their new music video.

 

Zibbz editorial for Blick magazine - musicians, available light

Zibbz editorial for Blick magazine

Zibbz musicians editorial for Blick magazine

Zibbz editorial for Blick magazine

 

Sep 232015
 

Surfing Lifestyle photography Newport Beach

Lately I’ve had the urge to shoot some new outdoor and active lifestyle images and decided to start with a little surfing, something I’ve shot relatively little of aside from my Still Stoked series on older surfers. I knew I wasn’t going to get great action shots around here that could compete with all of the amazing images you see of big wave surfers screaming down the face of Mavericks or Waimea Bay, so I decided the action would be secondary and set my sites on creating some very natural, photojournalistic images that conveyed the feeling of being out in the water. The first person that came to mind at this point was Vanessa Yeager, a talented and enthusiastic longboard surfer I met while shooting my recent Far West portrait series in Venice earlier this year, and whose daily surfing activity I’ve followed on her Instagram. So I messaged her and a couple weeks later found myself treading water at Blackies, a popular break by the Newport Beach pier.

When I first arrived the waves were small and mushy, the light flat. I wasn’t sure how things were going to go and was beginning to worry I’d made the 1 1/2 hour trip for nothing. Vanessa and her husband knew better though, leading me up the beach past a couple jetties where we found a decent swell. Around that time the sun started poking through the clouds and I knew we were good to go. Although the waves were a bit fast, for an hour or so things were pretty near perfect. Best of all, since the conditions had been poor only moments before, there were only two other surfers out there with us, creating the feeling that she had the whole place to herself. Rare circumstances these days anywhere on the California coastline. After an hour or so of shooting the scene darkened as sun dipped behind a wall of clouds on the horizon. Just then the after-work crowd started showing up and we knew it was time to call it a day.

It was a short, but successful outing. These are some of my favorites from the shoot.

Surfing Lifestyle photography Newport Beach

Surfing Lifestyle photography Newport Beach

Surfing Lifestyle photography Newport Beach

Surfing Lifestyle photography Newport Beach

Surfing Lifestyle photography Newport Beach

Surfing Lifestyle photography Newport Beach

Surfing Lifestyle photography Newport Beach

 

Jul 152015
 

Wall Street Journal Clip

A 2012 PRCA Clown of the Year belt buckle is one of the items rodeo clown Justin Rumford always keeps in his bags.                   Decorated rodeo clown Justin Rumford shows us the contents of his Bucks Bags rodeo bags during the Woodlake Lions Rodeo in Woodlake, Calif., on Sunday, May 10, 2015. Rumford, a barrelman clown and winner of the Pro Rodeo Cowboys Association (PRCA) 2012 Clown of the Year Award, is able to fit quite a bit into his bags, a necessity considering he is on the road traveling from rodeo to rodeo for much of the year. Some of his must have items include his 2012 PRCA Clown of the Year belt buckle, cowboy boots, clown makeup, huggies wipes, baby powder, batteries, an iPad and iPhone, a wireless microphone, a rope belt, a toothed australian hat, his cowboy hat, baggy jean shorts with suspenders, and costumes, including a gorrilla suit, spiderman suit and Evil Knievel suit, all of which are incorporated into his act. CREDIT: David Zentz for The Wall Street Journal                 FIXBAG_rodeo

Rodeo Clown Editorial Feature Wall Street Journal

Can you say culture shock? A day after returning from two weeks in Thailand I was back on the road, driving three hours north to Woodlake, Calif., to attend the annual Woodlake Lions Rodeo for a feature assignment for the Wall Street Journal. The piece was for their ongoing “What’s in your bag?” series, which profiles various professionals and asks them to share the contents of their totes, brief cases or what have you. The subject this time was Justin Rumford, an accomplished rodeo clown who kindly agreed to let us open up his two Bucks Bags rodeo bags and see what’s inside. What is inside, you ask? Some of the items I found included jumbo clown jean-shorts with suspenders, a leather belt with a 2012 Clown of the Year belt buckle, an iPad and iPhone, a microphone headset and extra batteries, Spiderman, gorilla and Evil Kneivel costumes, white makeup and a black grease pen. You know, clown stuff. It’s generally everything he would need to head out to a rodeo on short notice. Rumford, a resident of Oklahoma, spends much of his year on the road traveling from rodeo to rodeo, whenever possible living in his cozy RV. I also spent the day with him, shooting a few portraits as well as shooting him in action as he emceed, dodged bulls and generally clowned around in the arena. A barrelman clown, Rumford’s job is to assist with hosting the event, keep the crowd entertained between competitions with gags and stunts and to narrowly dodge bulls by diving into his custom-made barrel or hopping over the fence to safety. He does not run around in front of the bulls, antagonizing them to keep them away from the cowboys. That’s what the bullfighters are for. Still, it’s a dangerous job requiring him to intentionally draw a charge to his barrel to give the bull riders and bullfighters time to escape. The assignment was a fun break from the norm – if there is such a thing in this line of work. Click on the Continue Reading link to see more from the shoot.

Continue reading »

Oct 222014
 

Senior Surfers Jericho Poppler

 

Jericho Poppler Senior Surfers Portraits

 

I recently had my first encounter with a surfboard tree. What’s a surfboard tree, you ask? Well, for those of you who don’t know, which I can only imagine is most of you, it’s a part-wood, part-polyurethane, fiberglass and epoxy plant with a few leaves on top that grows about 20-30 feet in height and is exclusively found in the Capistrano Beach backyard of legendary surfer and board shaper Mickey Muñoz. I came across this arboreal aberration while photographing Mickey for my ongoing project on senior surfers. He was one of several new people I have had the great fortune to include in my project since my last posting and one of the most avid all-around watermen I’ve ever met. I first met him and Jericho Poppler, pictured above, at the Oceanside Longboard Surfing Club Contest in early August. It turned out that the two were surfing partners and agreed to meet me at Doheny State Beach a few weeks later to shoot some portraits and action. Both are extremely accomplished surfers. Nicknamed “The Mongoose,” Mickey, 77, excelled in big- and small-wave competitions in the 1960s and was also known for creating inventive moves such as the “Quasimoto.” He later went on to be known as a board shaper and sailor and recently chronicled his life on the water in his 2011 book “No Bad Waves.” Jericho, 62, made her name as one of the first full-time female professional big-wave surfers in the ’60s and ’70s, winning numerous championships including the title of IPS World Champion in 1976, and later won the first women’s World Longboard Championship. All while being the proud mother of five. While photographing the pair at Doheny, I also noticed Mickey’s truck, a pickup with a camper installed on the bed. He told me that he and his wife regularly slept in the back on surf outings, including regular trips to second home in Baja, Mexico. I knew I had to photograph him against it in order to show his lifestyle. We were having too much fun in the water, though, and after several hours, I had to get back for an appointment. Fortunately he was kind enough to allow me to meet him at his home at a later date, where I encountered the surfboard tree. Mickey’s home is organized chaos, an incredible museum of memorabilia and cluttered work areas indicative of a life of nonstop board shaping and tinkering on sailboat parts. I probably could have photographed him in any space there and made an interesting picture, but couldn’t help but be drawn to the tree, a combination resting and storage place for numerous boards. It was great getting to know both of them, and I’m thankful they were so generous with their time.

Mickey Munoz Senior Surfer Portraits

Mickey Munoz Senior Surfer

Mickey Munoz Senior Surfers

Mickey Munoz Senior Surfers

 

On to Surf City! I also found some connections in Santa Cruz with the help of the Santa Cruz Longboard Union and found some time in August to head up for a few days. There I met up with local surf legend Howard “Boots” McGhee and John Doty. Boots, 66, has been a lifelong fixture of the northern California surfing scene, learning to surf in Berkeley in 1963 before moving to Santa Cruz. He is a founding member of the Santa Cruz Surfing Museum and an environmental advocate who helped establish the Santa Cruz chapter of the Surfrider Association in 1990. Similar to John Moore from my previous post, he too continues to surf after undergoing a full knee replacement 13 years ago. We met at Pleasure Point, one of many breaks in the area and a fantastic spot for longboards. We had a great time talking on the shore while taking some portraits and then jumped into the frigid Northern California water to shoot some action. The waves were small that day, but Boots caught a few and the afternoon light was nice, so I emerged shivering, but happy with what I had shot. Finally there is John Doty, a lifelong surfer with the nickname of “Turtle,” who has recently been sidelined due to a stroke he suffered around three years ago. My original intent for this project was, and remains, to show active surfers who are still paddling out on a regular basis. I wasn’t aware that Doty wasn’t doing so until the day before I was to meet him, when I learned of his setback. I wasn’t sure how photographing a nonactive surfer would fit into this project, but decided to go ahead and pay him a visit anyway. I’m glad I did. In a group of super friendly subjects that I’ve met through this project, Doty could well be the friendliest. We spent about three hours talking at his house, about his and his family’s long history in the sport. In fact, I personally delivered a family heirloom trophy from 1916 that his uncle won when he defeated the legendary Duke Kahanamoku — the man largely credited for bringing surfing to the continental U.S. from Hawaii — to Boots McGhee for inclusion in the surfing museum. While we talked I took several portraits of him, most of which show his bubbly character. But a couple moments also indicated his sadness for not being able to take part in something he has done since the age of 5. Although he’s been out of the water for three years now, I have hope that he’ll soon return. His obstacle at the moment is his balance and the negative effects not riding for three years has had on his confidence. This I can relate to. I begin to doubt my abilities after I’m out of the water for a week. But his mind is sharp and he’s regularly out there riding bicycles, so I’m sure he’ll find himself popping up on a board sometime soon.

 

 

Boots McGhee Senior Surfer

Boots McGhee Senior Surfer Santa Cruz

John Doty Senior Surfers

John Doty Senior Surfers

 

That’s all for now. Hopefully I’ll find some new subjects this year before the water temperature drops. Otherwise, I’ll be sure to continue working on this in the spring.